Music

Drowning out the noise: Musical tastes don’t have to be defined by skin color

If you’re black, you must be into hip-hop and R&B. White kids love rock music. Those are the stereotypes, right? Except for one Somali girl, race and music don’t have to be defined so narrowly.

Cedar Cultural Center celebrates 25 years as a Minneapolis gem

As the Cedar Cultural Center celebrates its silver anniversary, the Minneapolis venue’s brain trust reflects on the power of live music and global awareness to build community.

@16: Brother Ali talks rap roots and racial judgments

The prolific Minneapolis-based rapper is never at a loss for words. Whether converting to Islam or discovering hip-hop, life as a teenager shaped everything Ali stands for today.

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@16: On the cusp of stardom, local favorite Jeremy Messersmith keeps it minimal

Whether he’s playing the main stage at First Avenue or signing a deal with Glassnote Records, Jeremy Messersmith has made his mark in the Twin Cities. But he hasn’t let success go to his head.

Keys for comfort: Teen pianist begins playing for right reasons

Danielle Wong’s relationship with her piano hasn’t always been harmonious. Then she started playing for herself.

Digital dilemma: Weighing the artistic and commercial ramifications of music piracy

Music pirates don’t always consider the consequences of illegal music downloads. That moral quandary, coupled with business considerations, can create quite a bit of controversy.

The accolades are just beginning for Lydia Hoglund

On more than one occasion, Lydia Hoglund exclaims, “Things are so crazy right now!” That’s a good thing for the in-demand lead singer of Bomba De Luz.

Whole lotta 'Love': Cloud Cult returns with new album, same creative ambitions

Cloud Cult’s mission has long transcended musicology. With a new album, “Love,” on the way, the Minneapolis band continues to push creative limits.

Behind the scenes: Interviewing Cloud Cult

As a former arts and entertainment writer, I’m always looking for ways to add a features element to ThreeSixty’s quarterly magazine.

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John Mark Nelson no longer waiting (and waiting) for his music career to begin

Thanks to a boost from local tastemaker station The Current, John Mark Nelson is living his music dreams at 18.

Artistic empowerment finds a voice on Kickstarter, YouTube

For some, the beauty of technology is that you never have to leave your bedroom. As Ka Lia Yang demonstrates, music can have a wide-reaching impact, all thanks to YouTube.

Spoken word artist Lisa Brimmer makes a living from what she loves.

Living art: Dedication and second jobs support artists' careers

Bryan Nichols makes money performing and teaching jazz, a big change from his original plan to become a doctor.

Ryan Liestman plays piano in South America

Jonas Bros’ piano player shares secrets of his success

Many teens have a desire to be a rock-star: The fame, the screaming fans, and the tight leather pants are just some of the pluses that come with the rock-star dream.

When is the best time to start listening to holiday music?

House MC, Gerald Shepherd, 30, of Minneapolis

Rapping for the Lord

The services at Urban Jerusalem Four Square Church in north Minneapolis may look and sound like a club with lights and bumping beats, but when you listen to the music, the lyrics of the songs are about God and Jesus Christ.

What radio station do you listen to?

Do you think mainstream artists are more talented than YouTube artists?

Rapper Brother Ali never earned his diploma, but he wants to now

Q & A with Rapper Brother Ali: High school opens huge doors

Local rapper Brother Ali never finished high school. It made him feel shame, which is why he helped out Minneapolis public schools with an effort to attract back high school drop outs by doing a TV commercial for the district. After finishing his current tour, Brother Ali plans to finish his diploma.

AUDIO STORY: Karaoke video games winning points with teens

Karaoke’s not just something drunk guys and girls do at bars anymore. The appeal of karaoke video games is growing.

“I didn’t really know what to expect in terms of how karaoke worked. I thought it was kind of corny how people would sometimes — like in movies you would see them standing and singing and sometimes they would sound really bad and I would just hope that I didn’t sound like that,” junior Elena Miller said.

While Elena sings, she watches a taller, sexed-up version of herself on the television screen. With long, black hair swinging behind her, Elena’s avatar shimmies to the music.

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